Just RPG - Reviews, PC and PS2 Walkthroughs, Previews, and RPG News!





HOME

Reviews
Previews
Walkthroughs
Strategy Guides
Articles
Interviews
Editorials
Links
About Us
Past Issues

June 14, 2011
March 22, 2011
Feb. 28, 2011
Dec. 14, 2010
Nov. 23, 2010
Nov. 9, 2010
Oct. 26, 2010
Oct. 6, 2010
Sept. 21, 2010
Sept. 14, 2010
Sept. 7, 2010
Aug. 31, 2010
Aug. 24, 2010
Aug. 17, 2010
Aug. 8, 2010
June 15, 2010
January, 2010
Dec. 21, 2009
Past Issues

Age of Conan: Unchained
Dark Souls
Dreamlords: Resurrection
Final Fantasy IV In-Pack Items
Mount and Blade: With Fire and Sword
League of Legends: Co-op V.S. AI
Final Fantasy IV
Duke Nukem Forever
Divine Souls Open Beta
inSANE
Mass Effect 3 Unveiled
League of Legends: Cassiopeia
League of Legends: Trundle
King Arthur: The Druids
Majesty 2: Monster Kingdom
RIFT Closed Beta
Deus Ex: Human Revolution
Magicka
Pandora Saga
DC Universe Online Screenshots
Fallout: New Vegas Add-On Content
League of Legends: Lux
Bloodline Champions: The Nomad
Majesty 2: Battles of Ardania
League of Legends: Battle Training
League of Legends: LeBlanc
Iron Cross
Prinny 2
Crusade Kings 2
Lionehart Kings' Crusade
Borderlands Game of the Year Edition
Castlevania Harmony of Despair DLC
Ys: The Oath in Felghana
Spiderweb Software's Birthday
League of Legends: Swain
Gormiti: Lords of Nature!
Disgaea 4
Castlevania: Lords of Shadow
League of Legends: Magma Chamber
League of Legends: Sona
War of Angels
King of Kings 3: Mage
Legend of Edda
Lionheart:Kings' Crusade
Cladun
Dreamlords
TERA
League of Legends
Silkroad Online Battle Arena
Grand Chase Thunder Hammer
Aika Global
The Shadow Sun
Saw ll: Flesh and Blood
TERA
Neverwinter
League of Legends
Castlevania Harmony of Despair
Smash Your Food
I SPY Spooky Mansion
Hexyz Force
World of Tanks
League of Legends
Mass Effect 2
DOFUS 2.0
DOFUS Screens
FFXIII Box
Puzzle Chron.
Gyromancer
Warhammer OL
Star Trek OL
Lost Saga Scr
Marvel DLC
League Legends
Poxnora
Demon's Souls
League Legends
League Beta
Fort Zombie
Arc Rise Fantasia
Arc Rise Screens
Mimana Iyar
League Screens
Marvel DLC
Free Realms
Adventures To Go
Fusion PR Group
Demon's Souls
AdventureQuest
Witch's Tale
League Legends
Half-Minute Scr
Half-Minute
Freaky Scr.
Valhalla
Dragon Quest
Vandal Hearts
Mytheon
Risen
Gemini Lost
Freaky
Gyromancer
FF Crystal
Dragon Quest
Star Trek OL
Fort Zombie
Disgaea 2
FF Crystal
Champions OL
Wizard of Oz
Star Ocean
League Legends
Valhalla Scr.
Dragon Age
Marvel Ultimate
Risen Website
League Legends
Adventurequest
Final Fantasy
Agarest War
Agarest War Scr.
Demon's Souls
SMT: Persona
Pangya
Dragon Age
Warhammer
Mana Khemia 2
Runes of Magic
Cursed Mtn.
Cursed Mtn. Scr.
Freaky Creature
Phantom Brave
Runes of Magic
Aion Goes Gold
Free Realms
Wizards Exec
Freaky Creature
Arma II
Champions
Aion CG Movie
Marvel Ultimate
FFIV Dev Diary
Steambot Chron.
League Legends
Phantom Brave
Runes of Magic
Champions
Champions Vid.
League Legends
League Trailer
Risen Screens
Freaky Creature
Star Treak DAC
Phantom Brave
Demon's Souls
Geneforge
The Witcher
Free Realms
Runes of Magic
Demon's Souls
Aion Screens
Fallout 3 DLC
Marvel Ultimate
PuchiPuchi Virus
League Legends
Fallout 3 DLC
Mytheon
Wizard of Oz
Oz Screens
Marvel Ultimate
La Tale
Asda Story
Avernum 6
Battle Fantasia
League Legends
Adventurequest
Warpforce
New Nintendo
Aion
FF Crystal Chron.
Mind Twist
Little King's
Stan Lee, Marvel
Elf Island
Ether Saga
Wizard101
Demon's Souls
League Legends
FFXI Trailer
Champions Online
Free Realms
Aion Preorder
BioShock/Elder
Silkroad Online
Warpforce
Warpforce Scr.
Runes Screens
Runes of Magic
League Legends
Marvel Ultimate
FF XIV
Knights
Asda Story
Champions
League Legends
Runes of Magic
FF XIV Online
Time of Shadows
Kingdom Hearts
FF IV
Demon's Souls
Lunar
League Release
League Trailer
Cross Edge
Runes of Magic
Phantom Brave
Crimson Gem
DC Universe
Freaky
SMT Devil
Steal Princess
Steal Screens
Wizard101
SMT Devil
Runes of Magic
Warrior Epic
Fallout 3 DLC
League Legends
League Screens
Bounty Bay
Bounty Bay Scr.
Ragnarok Scr.
Ragnarok Online
Runes of Magic
Time of Shadows
Time Scr.
Steambot Chron.
Adventures
Adventures Scr.
Warrior Epic
Sacred 2 Ships
Disgaea 2
Last Rebellion
Mana Khemia 2
Sakura Wars
Witch's Tale
Runes of Magic
Runes Screens
Class of Heroes
Sacred Trailer
Valhalla Knights
Wizard101 Gift
Freaky Creatures
Playboy Manager
Blizzcon 2009
Champions
Little King
League Legends
Wizard101
Wizard101 Scr.
Neverwinter
Warrior Epic Beta
Elder Scrolls
Warrio Epic Beta
Sacred 2
Utopia Kingdoms
Wizard101
Tweet in Games
Star Trek D-A-C
Champions
Champions Vid.
DragonSky Scr.
DragonSky
Free Realms
Free Realms Scr.
FFXI Vana'diel
DC Universe
Warrior Epic Scr.

 





Developer:
IO Interactive
Publisher: Eidos Interactive
Platform: PC
Release Date: 2000

by Nimish Dubey




You wake up in what seems to be a cell, drenched in sweat. You appear to have been clamped on to a bed near which are an impressive array of bloodstains. You are wearing what appears to be a patient’s smock. And all you have for company is a voice with a distinctly East European accent.


Yep, in terms of beginnings, Hitman: Codename 47 does rather well. The opening few seconds of the game have a distinctly eerie touch to them as the main character on the screen stumbles around, following directions and instructions being given to him by an unseen person.


But before we delve deeper, a few words about the game itself. Hitman: Codename 47 was the first in the Hitman series of games. Although primarily an action-oriented game (read “a game in which the main character jumps around, guns ablaze”), it was a major contributor to the development of the stealth genre of games, in which the main character has the option of sneaking, rather than shooting, his or her way to glory. There are many who feel that the game set the stage for the likes of Splinter Cell, by introducing a hero with the skills, but not a license, to kill. And talking of heroes, Hitman: Codename 47 did introduce one of gaming’s most popular characters – the monosyllabic, sleek, and spectacularly bald Agent 47.


The game came on a single CD, but while it installed without any problems, it played at literally breakneck speed on my high-end machine (Windows XP Pro, Intel Centrino 2 Ghz, 1 GB RAM, ATI Mobility Fire GL 3200 with 128 MB RAM), making sensible gameplay impossible (how on earth do you play a game when the lead character is running around like a demented maniac?). I consequently had to trade machines with the Missus – her more modest system (Windows XP Home, Intel Celeron 2.2 Ghz, 512 MB RAM, ATI Radeon IGP 330M with 16 MB RAM) played the game perfectly. So much for the advantages of high-end computers!


The game’s story line is rather intriguing – a person wakes up in some kind of prison, escapes to be trained as a master assassin (named Agent 47, based on the bar code that appears on the back of his bald pate) and then undertakes a series of missions to eliminate different people (generally criminal ganglords) in locales that range from Hong Kong to Latin America. But, although he is a trained assassin and highly skilled in the use of a variety of weapons, Agent 47 does not really have the luxury (if you can call it that) of charging in with guns blazing and mowing down everyone in sight. Ammunition and explosives are often at a premium – he gets a budget before every mission - and the enemy generally has overwhelming numerical advantage. This is where the stealth element of the game comes in. Agent 47 is a master of disguise and this allows him to slip unnoticed into hostile environments. And unlike in the Soldier of Fortune series where stealth was useful only for a limited amount of time, in Hitman, it is a critical component in most missions.


The missions themselves are more or less similar. You have to make your way into a heavily guarded place and bump off a person. Of course, as the place is heavily guarded, you need to get in as unobtrusively as possible. In most cases, this involves killing someone (rendering them unconscious, for some reason is not an option), slipping into their clothes, and then strolling into the place in this handy disguise. While the idea of being able to disguise yourself in your victim's clothes is a neat one, it does have its shortcomings. For instance, it seems that all the characters in the game have a universal-fit wardrobe - Agent 47 seems to be able to fit immaculately into the clothes of almost everybody. There is also the little matter of 47’s appearance – the guy would stick out like a sore thumb in a crowd with his height and bald pate, but no one seems to notice him once he wears someone else’s clothes. Weird!


That said, the narrative remains taut, and with each mission, Agent 47 discovers a bit more about himself, and not all that he finds out is pleasant. All of which builds up to a thrilling denouement where Agent 47 finds himself not only battling his manipulator, but also...well, himself. Nope, I can reveal no more other than the fact that it is pretty spectacular stuff.


The game has rather good graphics for the period in which it was made, and the sound effects are excellent. The voice acting for the most part is good – Agent 47’s dry, cynical tone is strongly reminiscent of Max Payne in places. Enemy AI is pretty good, too – if you are spotted doing something violent, there is a far chance that an alert will be issued within minutes, asking people to keep a look out for a suspicious assailant. And while killing itself is easy (whether you use a gun, bomb, or garrotte), you do need to hide your victims – if you leave them lying around, an alarm is likely to be sounded in no time at all. The game does not have too steep a learning curve – one can get to grips with it within 10-15 minutes. In terms of difficulty, the game is not too tough for those willing to bide their time and learn the ropes – the “let’s-go-in-with-guns-blazing” brigade will hate it though!


Unfortunately, a lot of this good work is thoroughly undone by the absence of a good Save Game system. The game operates on an auto save premise, which means that the game is saved automatically at some locations and you cannot save wherever you wish. And that can be a royal pain – imagine spending several minutes sneaking, disguising, and crawling your way to within inches of your victim, only to fail by a whisker. And then having to do it all from scratch because you do not have the option to save the game! Another minor niggle is the gameplay – while it is fluent for the most part, some things are decidedly odd. For instance, Agent 47 automatically decides when to jump (nope, you don’t have to hit the space bar, as in most games) from certain locations, irrespective of your wishes. The tutorial, too, is a bit of a pain, with your tutor sometimes lapsing into abrupt silence, leaving you with no option but to start from scratch.


For all that, Hitman: Codename 47 does deliver a fair deal of excitement and suspense. The mysterious assassin, the stress on stealth, and a decent narrative make it well worth playing. As for the flaws, do bear with them. The developers removed most of them in the sequel.


But that is another story. And another review.


Final Grade: 70%


System requirements:
Intel Pentium II 266 MHz CPU, 64 MB RAM, 400 MB Hard disk space, 8MB VRAM, Windows 95/98




All materials © 2000-2010 Just RPG
RPG Network: Free MMORPG | RPG Music